Suzanne Newcombe presents on ‘The status of indigenous medicine in India from the colonial period to the present’

08.11.2018

Suzanne Newcombe presents on ‘The status of indigenous medicine in India from the colonial period to the present’

Suzanne Newcombe will present at a workshop run as part of the 'Law Knowledges and the making of modern 'Health Care'' - a Wellcome Investigator Award (2017-2022) to explore the regulation of traditional and alternative medicines, historically and in contemporary contexts at the University of Kent.

Negotiating the boundaries of ‘legitimate healthcare’: regulation, normativities and the social ordering of alternative and traditional healing
Kent Law School, University of Kent, Canterbury. 8-9th November 2018

Abstract: A variety of indigenous medical practices have always been the primary form of health care for the majority of the Indian population. The introduction of ‘European biomedicine’ with colonialization in the nineteenth century was profoundly influential. However, its reach was always limited by practical economic and logistical difficulties and by those promoting swaraj (self-rule) and swadeshi (Indian-made) ideology. This paper will outline the legal and popular positions of indigenous medicine in India from the late nineteenth century to the present largely by analysing government reports and surveys.

The research for this paper is coming out of an ERC-funded Horizon 2020 project entitled AYURYOG which is examining examine the entangled histories of yoga, ayurveda and rasaśastra (Indian alchemy and iatrochemistry). Therefore, attention will also be given to how what was understood as ‘indigenous medicine’ expanded to include yoga (as well as including Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, naturopathy, homeopathy and Sowa Rigpa) during the twentieth century, culminating in the establishment of the Ministry of AYUSH in 2014 by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

 

© Ayuryog 2015 - University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 2, Hof 2.1 & Hof 2.7 (Campus), 1090 Wien